In "Letter to her Daughter" by Abigail Adams, which inconveniences seem to be most important to Abigail Adams?Support  your answer with Explanation   In the middle of the letter what...

In "Letter to her Daughter" by Abigail Adams, which inconveniences seem to be most important to Abigail Adams?

Support  your answer with Explanation

 

In the middle of the letter what instructions does adams give her daugther? why do you think adams makes this request?

 

Asked on by eddiemiza

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engtchr5's profile pic

engtchr5 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted on

Abigail Adams identifies just a few things that are inconvenient in this letter:

The lighting of the apartments, from the kitchen to parlors and chambers, is a tax indeed: and the fires we are obliged to keep to secure us from daily agues is another very cheering comfort. ... not one single (bell) being hung through the whole house, and promises are all you can obtain.

Other than the poor lighting and the lack of bells to indicate a need for service, Adams also says that she needs more wood to "keep fires."

Besides her complaints, though, she comments on some of the pleasantries of the White House's location: the scenery, the river, the view of boats coming and going, and other niceties are also expressed.

You may wish to put your other questions into new posts, as they address different matters.

 

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