Learning EnglishWriting in the formative years provides evidence that children are searching for the principles underlying the adult system(s). Discuss the stages of becoming a writer, the...

Learning English

Writing in the formative years provides evidence that children are searching for the principles underlying the adult system(s).

Discuss the stages of becoming a writer, the principles children explore in their writing and the principles controlling language development

include the following main points:

·        Children’s early encounters with the print

·        Different domains of literacy.

·        Writing scripts incorporated in emergent writing: Logographic, alphabetic and pictograms, examples and source.

·        Principles constituting the basis of the writing system.

·        Clay’s concepts on emergent writing.

·        Goodman’s explanation on writing development.

 

 

Asked on by small321

5 Answers | Add Yours

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

It's fascinating to watch young children learn to write. Perhaps you could consider younger siblings, cousins, or neighbors and ask them to write something for you. Then you'll have firsthand knowledge of the stages you describe here, and you'll see what the theories mean.
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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Perhaps it will assist you to recall your own first experiences of reading and writing, which is nothing more than thinking on paper.  As you do so, you can sift out the meaningful observations of the authorities, and in your retelling, make them significant as you order these observations in a realistic manner.

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booksnmore | College Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

It also looks like you'll want to find current articles by some of the specialists in early childhood/writing. You refer to (Marie?) Clay and (Ken/Yetta?)Goodman, but may also want to look for information from Lucy Calkins and others who've been involved with writing workshops.

jk180's profile pic

James Kelley | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

linda-allen's comments are very good. I would like to add just a little more detail about doing research. You certainly can put your key terms into a general search engine and sift through the results, looking for items that seem academic and supported by research. A more efficient way to locate solid academic resources on a specialized subject (such as children's literacy and children's writing skills, which is what you're talking about) is through a library database. The library (or the larger organization, such as a school or university) will subscribe to resources that aren't available through general search engines. I recommend that you speak with a librarian (or with some of the experts here on enotes) about two things: 1) good databases to use, expecially databases specializing in children's education and in language acquisition, and 2) good search terms to use to sift through material in those databases.

linda-allen's profile pic

linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

Looks like you have a major term paper to write. I'm afraid the editors at eNotes do not write papers for students. Instead, we will offer suggestions and give advice about how you should proceed with your paper. My advice to you is to start with some research. Try plugging each of your main points into a search engine and see what articles you can find written by experts in the field. Read those articles for information that is relevant to your topic, and make sure you fully document those sources so that you can give proper credit in your footnotes and bibliography.

Make a stab at writing your paper and then come back to the essay lab for more help.

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