In "The Lay of the Werewolf" by Marie de France, translated by Eugene Mason:  List true identity of the hero. Crisis faced by the hero. Disguised identity of the hero. Growth (experience,...

In "The Lay of the Werewolf" by Marie de France, translated by Eugene Mason: 

List true identity of the hero.

Crisis faced by the hero.

Disguised identity of the hero.

Growth (experience, wisdom, maturity) attained by the hero.

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amarang9 | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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Although Bisclavret is the werewolf in this story/poem ("lais"), he can be considered the hero. It is clear from the start of the poem that Bisclavret and his wife both love each other. The only potential problem are the times when he is away. He tries to convince her that it is best that she not know of his periodic absences. However, when he finally tells her, she can not deal with the knowledge that he is a werewolf. She conspires to hide his clothes, keeping him a werewolf indefinitely, and then she marries another man. She becomes the "beast" so to speak, or the antagonist. 

Bisclavret makes due with his double life as a man and a werewolf. His crisis arises when his wife discovers this double life and betrays him. The solution to the crisis is to get his clothes back, and perhaps get revenge as well. 

The hero's disguise is his state of being the werewolf. 

Given that Bisclavret knew that his wife would be repulsed by the knowledge that he is a werewolf, we can say that he was wise at the beginning of the poem. However, he did tell her so he probably did not suppose the degree to which she could betray him. There is some wisdom gained in this way. The reciprocal loyalty between the King and Bisclavret turns out to be stronger than the loyalty between Bisclavret and his wife. He discovers this when the King essentially adopts him while hunting in the woods. 

Sources:

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