Is the launguage formal or informal in Catching Fire?

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The book uses both formal and informal language. Collins is a professional author, so she is going to very much pay attention to grammar and usage rules when writing large sections of the book. The book may be told from a first person perspective; however, Collins doesn't allow things like...

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The book uses both formal and informal language. Collins is a professional author, so she is going to very much pay attention to grammar and usage rules when writing large sections of the book. The book may be told from a first person perspective; however, Collins doesn't allow things like subject and verb disagreement or using the wrong irregular verb form that tends to happen in informal, spoken language among teenagers. With that said, the narrative doesn't try to reach the formality that would be necessary for a paper written in academia. It would be a mistake for Collins to do that since she has chosen a minimally educated, teenage narrator. Katniss is a teenager, and the book is a young adult fiction novel. The reading audience of this book doesn't want to read incredibly formal narratives. They want a narrative about things they can relate to, and they want a protagonist that they can relate to. Katniss, as the narrator, has to be like the targeted audience; therefore, she has to be somewhat informal and use things like contractions to make the narrative sound more relatable and casual.

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The terms "informal" and "formal" as they pertain to language reference an author's choice of tone, vocabulary, phrasing, fluency, and syntax. Informal language is much more personal than formal language and can use contractions, slang, colloquialisms, idioms, and phrasal verbs. Formal language, on the other hand, steers clear of colloquial and casual speech, contractions, and idiomatic language. 

Thus, we can deduce that the second book in Suzanne Collins' Hunger Games series, Catching Fire, uses informal language. On the very first page of the book, we can see that Collins is using contractions ("I can't fight the sun...") and exhibiting other signs of informal language later in the chapter, including slang ("He's something of a whiz with snares..."). The book has a casual tone, and it sounds as if Katniss is confessing her feelings to the reader. Because we're experiencing the events in the present tense and through Katniss' first person narration, the book's voice takes on a very active, adventurous mood and voice--a far cry from the emotional distance and clinical nature of formal language. 

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