Analyze the mechanics of the lat pull down and the chestfly.For lat pull downs and chestflys, identify the prime muscle movers, antagonists (opposing muscles), joint involvement in the exercise...

Analyze the mechanics of the lat pull down and the chestfly.

For lat pull downs and chestflys, identify the prime muscle movers, antagonists (opposing muscles), joint involvement in the exercise movement, and joint action.

Asked on by islnds

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James Kelley | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

At least some of the information that you want can be gathered through an internet search and/or through your own slow, thoughtful reenactment of the exercises that you name. I've listed two links below for the lat pulldown.

To get you started, I'll gladly write the following:

Lat pulldowns primarily work the upper back muscle group ("lat" = latissimus dorsi) and the biceps. I'm not sure what the opposing muscle group for the lats are (the deltoids, I suspect; the lat pulldown is pretty much the opposite of the military press, after all); I'm more sure that the opposing group for the biceps (in this case, as in pretty much all cases) are the triceps.

The primary joints involved are the shoulder and elbow. (The neck could be considered involved, too, especiially if someone has bad form in the exercise.) I'm not sure what's meant here by "joint involvement" and "Joint action." I do know that the joints move in a way to close the gap in the exhale phase (the hard part, the "pull down"): as you pull the bar down, the elbow joint moves to allow the forearm to come closer to the bicep and the shoulder joint moves to allow the tricep to come closer to the side of the body. The opposite is true of the inhale phase (the slightly easier part, the "let up").

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