Lady Macbeth seems to act oddly in comparison to the average woman of that time period. During her soliloquy she seems as though casting a spell, her manipulative powers are all too advanced for someone living in such a repressed era, and she plays a vital role in the witches' plan. Could this be because she is one of them and thus in on the plan?

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Lady Macbeth would be a witch only in a metaphorical sense -- in the sense that she is associated with evil.  In some ways, in fact, she seems even more evil than the witches themselves. She is a far more active temptress of Macbeth than they are.

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I have to say that I have never looked at Lady Macbeth as the fourth witch (fifth, if you count Hecate). While she does try to evoke the spirits, she is unable to change her gender. Instead, she seems to believe too much in the power of man to be a witch (given the men have the power and the witches are women).

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An intersting idea, but I believe as she is ultimately destroyed by her conscience and commits suicide, she has simply been a willing participant in the witches' plan, rather than a witch herself. She asks them to fill her with cruelty AND to remove her capacity for remorse. The witches choose to oblige the request which suits their purpose (the cruelty) and ignore the second request (to block out her conscience).

When the witches say 'Macbeth shall sleep no more', I feel they are referring to both husband and wife: both are tools in their pernicious plan.

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