The Kite Runner is a novel about betrayal and redemption. Use three characters to show this to be true.Please explain how they betrayed and redeemed themselves. Also please give some examples from...

The Kite Runner is a novel about betrayal and redemption. Use three characters to show this to be true.

Please explain how they betrayed and redeemed themselves. Also please give some examples from text.

Asked on by jasin

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goreadabook | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

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Throughout the majority of this novel and all of Amir's adult life, he is plagued by the memory of Hassan's rape.  The immense guilt he feels for tending to his own self interests rather than helping Hassan has hindered his ability to live freely and maintain a sense of self-respect.  Amir betrayed Hassan several times in this novel; however, the two most important instances were when he did not help Hassan during the rape and when he framed Hassan for stealing the watch.  In order to redeem himself, he travels to Afghanistan to rescue Hassan's son after Hassan has been murdered by the Taliban.  By adopting Sohrab and bringing him back to America, it allowed Amir to do right by Hassan and make peace with himself.

Another example of betrayal is witnessed in Baba's relationship with his son, Amir.  Baba is unable to accept Amir for who he is during his childhood.  He is always comparing him to other boys and criticizing him for his shortcomings.  Amir spends most of his childhood trying to please his father which is one of the reasons he did not help Hassan after winning the kite flying competition. He was too concerned with making sure his father was proud of him.  Baba redeems himself by making a new life for him and Amir in America.  He is proud of his son after he graduates from college and helps him gain the favor of his future father in law just prior to his own death.

A final example of betrayal is when Zaman, the man who runs the orphanage in Afghanistan, hands over children to the Taliban.  He delivers them to these men, knowing full well that they will become the victims of physical, emotional, and sexual assault; however, he justifies it by saying that handing over one child is better than denying the Taliban and causing the death of many.  He never truly redeems himself, but he shows traces of humility and hope for redemption when he tells Amir where he can find the man who has Sohrab.  Although Zaman endangers the lives of some of the children, he protects many more by running the orphanage.

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