The Kite Runner demostrates the only way to escape the sins of the past is to confront them. Discuss this idea.  The Kite Runner demostrates the only way to escape the sins of the past is to...

The Kite Runner demostrates the only way to escape the sins of the past is to confront them. Discuss this idea.  

The Kite Runner demostrates the only way to escape the sins of the past is to confront them. Discuss this idea.

 

Asked on by gogetr

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mshurn's profile pic

Susan Hurn | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Personal redemption is surely the central theme of the novel, developed through Amir's experiences. I think your thesis suggests the idea, but I would question some of the diction, also.

Consider "escape" and "confront." Amir can't escape his sin (it happened), and he doesn't really escape his guilt; he lays it to rest. And then there's "confront." The argument could be made that Amir confronted his sin probably every day because he thought about it, probably every day. He confronted it, but he didn't do anything about it. It just continued to haunt him. I realize that's splitting hairs, but, hey, what's English all about? It's only when Amir takes action, returns to Afghanistan, faces fear, and saves Sohrab that he is redeemed and his guilt resolved.

How about either of these for a thesis?

The only way to redeem oneself from sins of the past is to atone for them.

Redemption from past sins can be achieved only by atoning for them.

Good luck with your paper. You've got a solid idea.

charcunning's profile pic

charcunning | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Assistant Educator

Posted on

I'm not so sure "escape" is the right word...perhaps "rectify"?  Or maybe you could even say that it's never to late to rectify the sins of the past?

Regardless, I think that when Rahim Khan says "there is a way to be good again" it proves that's it's not too late--there is a way to right the wrongs of the past.

Amir does, in fact, try to escape his past, but finds that the only real escape from it is to fix his past mistakes to the fullest extent--no, he cannot bring Hassan back after hearing about his tragic fate, but he can do right by Sohrab and take him to America to try to give him the life and love that he was not willing or able to offer to his Hassan.

The idea of redemption is what makes this novel so amazing and beautiful, the idea that no matter how stupidly we act or how selfish we can be, we can right our wrongs by owning up to our past mistakes and fixing what we can in the best way we are able.

mshurn's profile pic

Susan Hurn | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

This idea is developed very clearly through the character of Amir. Because of his own insecurity, self-hatred, jealousy, and fear, when he is young, Amir commits terrible acts against and in relation to his friend, Hassan. What makes Amir's acts so abominable even to himself is that he constantly compares his cruelty and cowardice with Hassan's kindness and courage. Ironically, the more shame Amir feels, the more he abuses Hassan. Events reach a crisis when Amir, out of fear, does not come to Hassan's aid when Hassan is brutally attacked by the same neighborhood bullies from whom he had previously rescued Amir, armed only with a slingshot. Because of this new, overwhelming shame, Amir cannot bear to be in Hassan's company. Through lies and trickery, Amir forces Hassan out of Baba's home. Even though Amir never sees Hassan again, he never forgets the terrible sins he has committed.

Amir's spiritual salvation, his moral redemption, occurs years later when he overcomes personal fear, returns to a now-deadly Afghanistan, refuses to back down, endures a terrible, life-threatening beating, and rescues Hassan's son Sohrab from terrible abuse. As a boy, Amir had done nothing to save Hassan; as a man, he redeems himself by returning to Afghanistan, facing his past, and acting with honor and courage.

epollock's profile pic

epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

Amir can find redemption in himself if he gives the life that he couldn't give to Hassan to Sohrab.

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