King lears love test was selfish, vain, and detrimental to the wellbeing of his family and friends. Can anyone help me debate this topic from both sides?This is for a school debate! any...

King lears love test was selfish, vain, and detrimental to the wellbeing of his family and friends. Can anyone help me debate this topic from both sides?

This is for a school debate! any points/arguments would help!

Asked on by angelo12

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jlc40 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

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On the one hand, Lear's behavior appears vain and misguided. Instead of accepting the behavior of his daughters to evaluate their love, he insists on flowery proclamations and flattery to prove their love to him. On the other hand, Lear is a king in a time when kings were doted on, flattered, and admired as common practice. Not only that, he was a king who was preparing to divide his kingdom among his three daughters. His asking for a declaration of love from each of them may have been his way of seeking reassurance for his abdication of authority and power. He may have been motivated as much by insecurity - as his future behavior in the play indicates - as by ego.

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