In To Kill a Mockingbird, why does Scout say Uncle Jack doesn't understand children?

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Following Scout's confrontation with Francis at the family's Christmas gathering, Uncle Jack spanks Scout for attacking her cousin. When Atticus and the children return home, Uncle Jack attempts to speak to Scout about her actions. Uncle Jack proceeds to tell Scout that he is upset with her, and she...

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Following Scout's confrontation with Francis at the family's Christmas gathering, Uncle Jack spanks Scout for attacking her cousin. When Atticus and the children return home, Uncle Jack attempts to speak to Scout about her actions. Uncle Jack proceeds to tell Scout that he is upset with her, and she replies,

"You ain't fair.... You're real nice, Uncle Jack, an' I reckon I love you even after what you did, but you don't understand children much." (Lee 88).

Uncle Jack seems confused but lets Scout elaborate on her comment. Scout explains to her uncle that she never had a chance to tell her side of the story. Scout goes on to say that Francis had provoked her, and she felt justified punching him in the face. When Uncle Jack learns that Francis called Atticus a "nigger-lover," he is disgusted and thoroughly upset. However, Scout makes him promise not to tell Aunt Alexandra about it. Later on, Scout overhears Uncle Jack tell Atticus,

"Your daughter gave me my first lessons this afternoon. She said I didn’t understand children much and told me why. She was quite right. Atticus, she told me how I should have treated her—oh dear, I’m so sorry I romped on her" (Lee, 90).

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This happens in Ch. 9 when Scout and Francis fight over Francis calling Atticus a name for representing Tom Robinson. Scout gets mad and attacks Francis and instead of asking Scout her side of the matter, Uncle Jack simply punishes her. He says her actions were "obstreperous, disorderly, and abusive" (Ch.9).This prompts Scout to explain to him why she said he is not good with children.

Essentially, she tells him that whenever something happens, Atticus asks both sides of the story before coming to a decision on who, if anyone, should be punished. Uncle Jack "just lit right into" Scout instead. 

Once she explains her side of the story and the fight, Uncle Jack is furious at Francis and understand completely why Scout did what she did. This causes Jack to feel bad. Although he does not apologize for punishing Scout, he does help bandage up her hand and promises not to tell Atticus about the day's events.

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