In To Kill a Mockingbird, what are three intolerances from which Mayella Ewell suffers that make her an embodiment of a mockingbird? For example, she suffers from gender intolerance because she...

In To Kill a Mockingbird, what are three intolerances from which Mayella Ewell suffers that make her an embodiment of a mockingbird? 

For example, she suffers from gender intolerance because she is a girl and looked down upon by her father who abuses her, and she also suffers social class intolerance because she is poor and no one from the town wants to associate with her, but I need one more intolerance which Mayella Ewell suffers from making her an embodiment of a mockingbird. Please don't say she isn't one cause I just would please like an answer!

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Mayella is certainly one of the human mockingbirds in the story, and you have a good start with the gender and social prejudices that hinder her. Another example would be the limited education that she has received. Although Mayella can read and write, she apparently did not attend school for long, and she probably only has basic elementary schooling. Consequently, she seems lost on the witness stand, barely understanding some of Atticus's simple questions. She has also been forced to become the female head of the household at a young age, staying home to look after the other younger Ewell children who also do not attend school. Her lack of social interaction and total naivete--she apparently has no close friends--is evident when she misunderstands Atticus's polite demeanor for sarcasm. She receives little love or consideration from the others, and deserves the pity that Scout initially feels for her. Her loneliness is so overwhelming that she seeks out the only man who seems to treat her with any respect--her fellow human mockingbird, Tom Robinson.

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