In Part One of To Kill a Mockingbird, what are the different events in which Jem and Scout learn to appreciate the importance of tolerance?  Looking at how they are taught tolerance, and how they...

In Part One of To Kill a Mockingbird, what are the different events in which Jem and Scout learn to appreciate the importance of tolerance?

 

Looking at how they are taught tolerance, and how they pick it up from seeing adults being intolerant (examples), and other aspects. I don't have many ideas.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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EXAMPLES OF TOLERANCE IN PART ONE OF TKAM

Jem.  When Jem is chewed out by Atticus about the children playing their Boo Radley game on the public sidewalks, he learns how it is a form of invading one's privacy. When Nathan Radley cements the secret knothole, eliminating the children's only connection to Boo, Jem is forced to accept that the action is both cruel and unnecessary, but that it is also Nathan's right to do so. Jem receives his biggest lesson on tolerance when he is forced to read to Mrs. Dubose after losing his temper and destroying the old lady's camellias.

Scout.  Scout learns that she must be patient at school, not only with the other students (Walter Cunningham, Burris Ewell) but also with her inexperienced teacher, Miss Caroline. She also learns a lesson in etiquette from Cal after she embarrasses Walter at the dinner table. Scout is finally able to hold her tongue when Cecil Jacobs criticizes Atticus and calls her a "cow--ward!", knowing that she will let Atticus down if she uses her fists to settle things. She is forced to deal with Alexandra's decision to make Scout sit with Francis at the little table away from the adults; Atticus tells her it's Alexandra's house and her decision. Though Scout fails to honor her promise to Atticus about fighting, she gives her Uncle Jack a lesson when she explains her reasons for "splitting my knuckle to the bone" on her Cousin Francis's front teeth. 

Both of the children hold their tongues when Mr. Avery blames them for bringing on the unseasonably cold weather in Maycomb, and Jem is forced to alter the "Morphodite Snowman" after Atticus tells him that it represents "a near libel here in the front yard."

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