In To Kill a Mockingbird, what are Bob and Mayella's motives for falsely accusing and testifying against Tom?

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One could argue that Bob Ewell's primary motivation for falsely accusing Tom Robinson of assaulting and raping his daughter is to protect himself from any legal ramifications stemming from severely beating Mayella. According to Tom's testimony, Bob Ewell witnessed his daughter kissing him and yelled, "...you goddamn whore, I’ll kill ya" (Lee, 198). After Tom fled the scene, Bob Ewell choked and punched his daughter numerous times in the face. Knowing that the authorities would believe his word over a black man's testimony, Bob Ewell falsely accused Tom Robinson of assaulting and raping Mayella to protect himself. Bob Ewell is also a malevolent racist who hates black people. His racist personality could be an additional motivating factor for falsely accusing Tom Robinson of assaulting and raping his daughter. Mayella Ewell's primary motivation for falsely accusing Tom Robinson is to protect her reputation. She understands that she broke a time-honored social code by tempting a black man and fears the consequences of her actions. She is also afraid that her father will beat her again if she does not corroborate his story.

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We don't know for sure, but the following scenario probably occurred: According to Tom's testimony, after he tried to make his getaway from Mayella, who had hugged and kissed him and was demanding that she kiss him back, Bob showed up as Tom was leaving the house. Bob may have seen Mayella hugging Tom, and he may have actually seen Mayella kissing Tom. He must have realized that Tom wouldn't have been in house without her permission. In any case, Bob yelled,

"... you goddam whore, I'll kill you."

Bob must have then beaten Mayella and afterward, he decided to blame Tom for the injuries to his daughter. Bob hated Negroes, and he must have hated Tom just for being inside his house. Blaming Tom would eliminate any legal trouble Bob might encounter for the beating he gave his daughter (though he would probably never have been charged), and he would have the pleasure of seeing an innocent Negro blamed for his own brutality. Mayella, of course, went along with her father's story, since she feared him more than anything else.

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