In Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, where is the following passage located: There's four kinds of folks in the world. There's the ordinary kind, like us and the neighbors, there's the kind...

In Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, where is the following passage located:

There's four kinds of folks in the world. There's the ordinary kind, like us and the neighbors, there's the kind like the Cunninghams out in the woods, the kind like the Ewells down at the dump, and the Negroes.

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Tamara K. H. | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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The passage in question is located in Chapter 23 of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, which takes place immediately after the trial. Jem and Scout approach their father Atticus because they're afraid Bob Ewell may attack him. They further talk about the jury's racist decision to sentence Tom Robinson to death and his prospects for an appeal. Their conversation further leads to a conversation about the Cunninghams because Atticus has heard it rumored that a relation of Walter Cunningham's on the jury would have voted to acquit Tom Robinson. Scout announces she wants to invite Walter Cunningham home for dinner, which incites a very hostile and judgmental reaction from Aunt Alexandra. Aunt Alexandra's following conversation about class distinctions upsets Scout so much that Jem has to lead her away from their aunt "sobbing in fury." However, during their private conversation in Scout's bedroom about how Walter Cunningham isn't like the Ewells, Jem only observes, "There's four kinds of folks in the world. There's the ordinary kind like us and the neighbors, there's the kind like the Cunninghams out in the woods, and kind like the Ewells down at the dump, and the Negroes." He further carries on talking about how "our kind of folks" don't like other kinds of folks and so on and so on.

Regardless, Scout reaches her own conclusion: "Everybody's gotta learn, nobody's born knowing ... Naw, Jem, I think there's just one kind of folks. Folks." Scout's conclusion underscores Lee's themes attacking bigotry and racism.

Since different publications of the book will have different page numbers, it's difficult to state the page number on which the passage in question is found for certain; however, it is located very close to the end of Chapter 23--about 2 pages from the end. It also may be correct to say it is located approximately at the top of the second-to-last page of Chapter 21 and approximately page 230.

Sources:

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