In a To Kill a Mockingbird essay, what would be some solid supporting arguments for the theme of justice and its absence from Maycomb?Other parts of the essay would be helpful such as...

In a To Kill a Mockingbird essay, what would be some solid supporting arguments for the theme of justice and its absence from Maycomb?

Other parts of the essay would be helpful such as introductory and conclusion sentences. 3 characters with examples of their taking part in or undergoing injustice would be appreciated.

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mstultz72 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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The theme of justice is echoed in its ideal by Atticus in his closing remarks to the jury:

Courts are the great levelers and a court is no better than each man of you sitting before me on this jury.

In this way, Atticus is trying to humanize the otherwise abstract notion of justice.  Atticus is trying to internalize the concept: it is in all of us.  He particularly wants the men of Maycomb to find the courage to defy institutional racism and segregation.

Earlier, Scout did this during the attempted lynching of Tom Robinson.  She humanized the lynch mob by telling Walter Cunningham Sr. that she knew his son and to tell him "hey."  This made Walter Sr. ashamed of himself as a individual.

Walter Sr. is also on the jury, and so Atticus is hoping that one man can take the leadership to convince the others to look at the facts of the case (justice) instead of the skin color.  If he can sway just one man individually, Atticus knows that the group may also look inside themselves.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The two most obvious examples of injustice in To Kill a Mockingbird concern the treatment of Tom Robinson and Boo Radley. Tom is falsely accused of rape and assault; he is jailed, tried and convicted despite evidence that he was incapable of the accusations; and he is later shot and killed--with seventeen bullet holes in his body. Tom's wife, Helen, is later stalked and harrassed by Bob Ewell, the true culprit of the aforementioned crimes.

Boo Radley has been viciously and unfairly treated by his parents and the town during his sad life. Forcibly confined to the inside of his house, Boo is nevertheless blamed for many unexplained occurrences in Maycomb. Instead of a ghoulish fiend, however, he turns out to be a kind and heroic character.

Other examples of injustice include the undeserved beliefs about Dolphus Raymond; Scout's treatment at the hands of Miss Caroline; the treatment of African-Americans as second-class citizens; and the gender inequity of females.

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