What is the thought pattern in this passage from To Kill a Mockingbird? "Our first raid came to pass only because Dill bet Jem The Gray Ghost against two Tom Swifts that Jem wouldn’t get any...

What is the thought pattern in this passage from To Kill a Mockingbird?

"Our first raid came to pass only because Dill bet Jem The Gray Ghost against two Tom Swifts that Jem wouldn’t get any farther than the Radley gate. In all his life, Jem had never declined a dare.” (paragraph 30)

Is the thought pattern

A. Time order
B. Cause and effect
C. Generalization and example
D. Contrast

Asked on by majellamk

1 Answer | Add Yours

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The correct answer is B. Cause and effect. 

One clue to this answer is grammatical: the use of the word "because" signals cause and effect.
The other clue to the answer is contextual; that is, the reader determines that one action (cause) brings about another (effect). That is, the challenge made to Jem in the form of a dare, as well as Dill's taunting him about "running out" on this dare, causes Jem to change his mind and perform the action which Dill wants him to take.

In Chapter 1, Charles Baker Harris, otherwise known as Dill, bets the reluctant Jem his novel The Grey Ghost against two Tom Swifts that Jem will not approach the Radley house and attempt to get Boo to come outside. Scout narrates that only because Jem "had never declined a dare" does anything result from this bet since Jem is afraid to approach this house. In fact, it takes three days of taunting from Dill, who says, "You're afraid" and who challenges Jem, "You gonna run out on a dare?" to get Jem to finally act.

[Jem's trait of never passing on a dare = the cause
Jem's spproaches the Radley house, and slaps the corner of it with his palm = the effect]  

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,915 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question