To Kill a Mockingbirdthink of the event you think had the greatest influence on scout so far. in a well written paragraph, explain off and why this event is so important to scout's development as a...

To Kill a Mockingbird

think of the event you think had the greatest influence on scout so far. in a well written paragraph, explain off and why this event is so important to scout's development as a child and the narrator

4 Answers | Add Yours

ask996's profile pic

ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

Two events seem to go hand in hand as having incredible impact on Scout. When they find themselves wrapped in a blanket on the night of the fire is the first time Scout begins to see Boo Radley as a kind and caring person who has empathy for others. When Boo's brother seals off the tree where Boo had been leaving trinkets for "his kids" serves to empower Scout with empathy for Boo. She begins then to understand better Atticus's strictures about "mockingbirds."

lmetcalf's profile pic

lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

Another event from early in the novel that will affect Scout for a good portion of the novel is the children's attempts to try to learn more about Boo Radley.  His house is scary; they have only heard bad stories about him; they are both intrigued and fearful of him.  The various games and "interactions" they have with Boo make him someone they don't understand, which will ultimately serve the complete reversal Scout has by the end of the novel when she reveals a much more mature understanding of Boo Radley.

auntlori's profile pic

Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I am going to assume you're not very far into the novel, as well. Scout's experience at school is important because it establishes many significant things. First, Scout is precocious but still naive, traits which she will exhibit throughout the novel. Second, there are different expectations from different classes of people, again a theme throughout the novel. Finally, "outsiders" have a difficult time understanding Maycomb, so we are thankful to get an insider's view--even if she is only eight.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

When you say "so far," it would be good to tell us how far you have gotten...

One of the earliest really important things that happens to Scout is the way that Calpurnia punishes her in Chapter 3 when she acts as if she is better than Walter Cunningham.  That really starts her on her way to understanding one of the major things that Calpurnia and Atticus are trying to teach her--the idea that all people should be treated with respect and consideration.

 

We’ve answered 318,916 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question