Juxtaposition in chapter 10 of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.  

The juxtaposition in Chapter 10 of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is between Stamps and St. Louis. In this chapter, Maya Angelou presents the ways that life changed for her and her brother, Bailey, when they moved in with their Baxter grandparents to live near their mother. Angelou juxtaposes the small Arkansas town to the large Missouri city. Two notable aspects she contrasts are food and school.

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In chapter 10 of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings , Maya Angelou juxtaposes Stamps and St. Louis. Juxtaposition is a literary device by which the author places characters, places, or ideas beside each other to compare or contrast them. In this chapter, Angelou focuses on drastic changes that...

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In chapter 10 of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou juxtaposes Stamps and St. Louis. Juxtaposition is a literary device by which the author places characters, places, or ideas beside each other to compare or contrast them. In this chapter, Angelou focuses on drastic changes that moving brought to her life and that of her brother, Bailey. The children moved to St. Louis but did not immediately live with their mother; instead, they spent half a year living with their maternal grandparents, the Baxters.

The basic juxtaposition places the small Arkansas town against the large Missouri city. Within a single paragraph, she often alternates several times between the two settings. Angelou spends considerable time contrasting the food and the schools they attended.

In Stamps, where they lived with their other grandmother, Momma, and worked in the Store, much of the food was prepared at home. Peanuts are one type of food in which Ritie saw major differences. In Stamps, people picked peanuts and roasted them. In St. Louis, the roasted peanuts were purchased and then mixed with jellybeans; Angelou declares this tasty snack to be the “best thing” in the city.

Several features about school are juxtaposed. Angelou stresses that she and Bailey were advanced compared to the “shockingly backward” children in the city school. Contrasting the teachers in both places, she notes that in Stamps teachers were friendlier. In St. Louis, they were more formal and talked down to their students.

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