How do I write a 1 page journal relation between two readings?I just started college. I was never taught what a journal is or format for writing one. is it an analysis or summary? Do i need to add...

How do I write a 1 page journal relation between two readings?

I just started college. I was never taught what a journal is or format for writing one.

is it an analysis or summary? Do i need to add quotes and citation? in what person should it be? example: I, He/She.

Asked on by boggzy

1 Answer | Add Yours

lmetcalf's profile pic

lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

A journal is usually a personal written response to something. You can write a daily journal recording your daily experiences, or in this case, you can write a journal response to capture your thoughts and reactions to a piece of reading you have done.  Journal writing is meant to be personal, so using first person is probably ok.   Your journal could be a mixture of both summary and analysis, but to be a useful tool to help you practice your analytical writing skills, I would encourage you to avoid excessive plot notes, and choose what strikes you as important from a more literary perspective. For example, instead of a summary of the two readings, notice one or two things the two readings have in common (or do opposite ways) and then journal/respond to what you think the significance of those points is to understanding the work(s) as a whole. 

In being more specific in your response you would likely use quotes, especially if you want to comment on some literary device or the diction of the quote.  Quotes usually help your response stay more focussed.  As you ask yourself, "What do I think?"  What is unique about the way this is written?"  "What do I like about it?"  "What questions do I have?"  "What is the point and how does the author lead me there?"  "Do I agree with the point(theme) made by the author?"  If you build your own list of internal reading questions, you can always draw on those to help you craft a journal response.  Think of your journal writing as one way for you to learn more about what you are reading.

 

We’ve answered 318,944 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question