How Does Cassius Die

How did Cassius die in Julius Caesar?

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Tim Mbiti eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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In Act V, Cassius, Brutus, Antony, and Octavius meet on the plains of Philippi. Their encounter ends up in an argument which confirms the imminent battle between the two factions. Brutus and Cassius separate in order to take charge of their individual armies and to face those of Antony and Octavius.  Brutus asks Messala to begin the attack on Octavius’s army, who seemed unsettled.

Brutus’s troops emerged victorious against Octavius’s army. Cassius, on the other hand, is surrounded and sends Titinius to confirm the people in the tents.  Cassius is led to believe that his friend Titinius has been captured by the enemy.

He offers his slave Pindarus his freedom and in exchange requests the slave to kill him using the same sword he used to assassinate Caesar. Pindarus unwillingly does as instructed and drives the sword through Cassius, killing him. However, Cassius’s actions are not well informed because Titinius met Brutus’s troops and not the enemies’. After Cassius’s death, Brutus is left to battle alone.

Cassius dies by his own sword when he requests Pindarus to kill him.

Come hither, sirrah.
In Parthia did I take thee prisoner,
And then I swore thee, saving of thy life,
That whatsoever I did bid thee do,(40)
Thou shouldst attempt it. Come now, keep thine oath;
Now be a freeman, and with this good sword,
That ran through Caesar's bowels, search this bosom.
Stand not to answer: here, take thou the hilts;
And when my face is cover'd, as 'tis now,(45)
Guide thou the sword.

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Walter Fischer eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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In Act V, Scene III of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar , Cassius is observing the defeat of his army at the hands of Marc Antony's soldiers.  Standing with him is Pindarus, his slave and trusted messenger.  Unable to accept life following such a humiliating defeat as he is enduring, and bereft over his role in the assassination of Julius...

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