Describe Juliet's relationship with the Nurse and explain how it changes and why.

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It is true that at the beginning of the play, Juliet and her Nurse are close enough to be mother and daughter—they are much closer than Juliet is with her actual mother. In fact, in Act 1, Scene 3, Shakespeare reveals that the Nurse was in fact Juliet’s wet nurse ...

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It is true that at the beginning of the play, Juliet and her Nurse are close enough to be mother and daughter—they are much closer than Juliet is with her actual mother. In fact, in Act 1, Scene 3, Shakespeare reveals that the Nurse was in fact Juliet’s wet nurse:

Even or odd, of all days in the year,

Come Lammas –eve at night shall she be fourteen.

Susan and she – God rest all Christian souls!—

Were of an age: well, Susan is with God; (I.iii.v17-20)

And she was wean’d – I never shall forget it –

Of all the days of the year, upon that day:

For I had then laid wormwood to my dug, (I.iii.v.24-26)

Imagine the emotional bonding that would take place between a baby girl and a wet nurse who’d just lost her own baby girl! Emotionally, the Nurse regards Juliet as her daughter in truth. This puts Juliet’s reaction to the disagreement in perspective, for how many teenage daughters have never cursed their mothers and claimed they “just didn’t understand”?

However, I feel that their relationship doesn't necessarily end at the point of the exchange in Act 3, Scene 5. I do agree that Juliet feels betrayed and is then forced to get help and advice from the Friar, with disastrous results. However, even in turning against Romeo, the Nurse is looking out for Juliet’s best interests. She never wavers in her love. It would be unrealistic to expect that the Nurse’s love, after everything she had done up to this point, would wither under the heat of one argument. It is, however, realistic to assume that had Juliet lived, she would have at some point reconciled with her Nurse. This adds a subtle but poignant note to the tragedy of Juliet’s death.

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In the play Romeo and Juliet, the Nurse and Juliet have a strong relationship. This is largely due to the fact that the Nurse essentially raised Juliet since she was an infant.

'Tis since the earthquake now eleven years,
And she was weaned—I never shall forget it— (I.iii.25-26)
This quote illustrates the closeness of the bond between the Nurse and Juliet. The Nurse also often gives advice to Juliet and keeps Juliet's relationship with Romeo a secret, which increases Juliet's trust in the Nurse. However, once the Nurse begins to disagree with Juliet, their relationship begins to end. After Romeo's banishment, the Nurse suggests Juliet marry Paris:
Oh, he’s a lovely gentleman.
Romeo’s a dishclout to him (III.v.219-220)
After the Nurse insults Romeo by calling him a dishcloth, Juliet becomes very upset. When the Nurse leaves Juliet to her own thoughts, she remarks angrily, "Ancient damnation! O most wicked fiend!" This contrasts greatly with their previous trusting relationship, as Juliet feels the Nurse has betrayed her.
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At the beginning of the play up until Romeo is banished, Juliet and the Nurse have a very close relationship, much like a daughter and a mother. Juliet is more willing to share her thoughts with the Nurse than her mother. When she meets Romeo, Juliet tells the Nurse all about it, and the Nurse is involved in their plans for marriage. The Nurse truly cares about Juliet's happiness. However, she makes a big mistake when Romeo kills Tybalt and is banished as a result. The Nurse turns against Romeo and suggests that Julieit should go ahead and marry Paris, even though she's married to Romeo. This is when Juliet stops confiding in the Nurse and depends solely on Friar Laurence for help. Juliet can no longer trust the Nurse if she does not support her marriage to Romeo.

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