In The Great Gatsby, how can Jordan Baker's criticism of Daisy be explained when she is supposedly her friend?In  Chapter 7: "You forget there's a lady present" she murmured,"What a low,vulgar...

In The Great Gatsby, how can Jordan Baker's criticism of Daisy be explained when she is supposedly her friend?

In  Chapter 7:

"You forget there's a lady present" she murmured,"What a low,vulgar girl" .... "Dont` be morbid,"Jordan said,"life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall."

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Jordan Baker, with her static "gray sun-strained eyes" seems typical of the flapper of the Roaring Twenties: reckless, amoral, self-serving, and aloof. Indeed, Jordan Baker's friendship with  Daisy is somewhat ambiguous; perhaps, theirs is too intimate a friendship.  Or, there may be something facetious in Jordan's comment, "What a low, vulgar girl!" as she pushes Daisy to exclaim, "I don't care!" and reveal her careless nature that indulges itself whenever it wishes. Unlike Daisy, Jordan is, Nick comments, "...too wise ever to carry well forgotten dreams from age to age."

At any rate, in this ambiguity of scene as well as in others, Jordan Baker is a character who constantly poses and does not reveal herself. Thus, it may be that Jordan checks Daisy in her scandalous behavior that a tabloid would love to print.  In a world where there are eyes that watch (Dr. T. J. Eckleburg), cameras, and reporters throughout, it is necessary to perform and always pose. Thus, concludes critic Maggie Frocklick, Jordan's "whiteness" is an attempt at invisibility: her extended silences, her "non-sequiturs," are intentional and meant to avoid scandal.  This is why Jordan says she enjoys large parties because they are so "intimate."

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