Johnny, Ponyboy, and Dallas are heroes for rescuing the children. Why is it ironic when Jerry Wood says they were sent from heaven?

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After Pony, Johnny, and Dally's heroic actions, Jerry Wood asks if they were sent from heaven. Pony recognizes the irony of Jerry's comment and thinks to himself, "Sent from heaven? Had he gotten a good look at Dallas ?" (Hinton, 81). It is ironic that Jerry asks if they...

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After Pony, Johnny, and Dally's heroic actions, Jerry Wood asks if they were sent from heaven. Pony recognizes the irony of Jerry's comment and thinks to himself, "Sent from heaven? Had he gotten a good look at Dallas?" (Hinton, 81). It is ironic that Jerry asks if they were sent from heaven because Pony and his friends are anything but angels and reside in the roughest, poorest section of town. The East Side is the complete opposite of paradise and the boys have a negative reputation throughout town as hostile criminals. Dally is certainly not "sent from heaven" and has been to prison for committing some serious crimes in New York. He is depicted as a foul-mouth, aggressive teenager, who has an affinity for violence and breaking laws. In addition to Dally's mile-long police record, Johnny is wanted for murder and has been avoiding the authorities in an abandoned church on Jay Mountain. All three boys are considered outcasts in their society and are discriminated against for being lowly Greasers. Despite their negative reputations and intimidating appearances, all three boys possess heroic traits and risk their lives in order to save the innocent children in the burning church.

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Johnny, Ponyboy and Dallas, the main characters of Susan Hinton's novel, The Outsiders, have never been mistaken for angels. They are greasers, one of the lowest of the social classes in 1960s Tulsa, Oklahoma. Johnny and Ponyboy are on the run after killing a rival Soc nearly a week before. Dallas has a rap sheet in both Tulsa and New York City. The boys have accidentally set fire to the church, causing the situation which has endangered the young children picnicking there. Yet, when the boys come to the rescue and save the kids from burning, all their faults seem tiny in comparison to their heroic deed. Jerry is right. The greaser outsiders were like angels sent from heaven--or else "just professional heroes or something."

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