In Brave New World, what does John mean when he uses a Shakespeare quote during a talk about his objection to soma?

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Felicita Burton eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Both John and his mother, Linda, are anomalies in the society of the future that Aldous Huxley describes. Although John is considered a “savage,” he has read the classics, rather than being entertained with a constant diet of feelies. Lines from the works of William Shakespeare frequently occur to him as appropriate for analyzing the strange qualities of those modern times. Linda, although she lived for many years away from the new social pressures, has retained a need to escape her surroundings. The doctors who are supposedly treating her instead use her as a human test case to observe the effects of soma (chapter 11). Dr. Sawyer rationalizes his treatment by saying it is for her own good.

The idea of eternity as an experience during life, as opposed to an afterlife, is raised as part of this rationale. When John...

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librajrd | Student

I believe that this quote refers to John's sudden realization that eternity, or in this case percieved hapiness, is what we see and taste but not what may actually exist.

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