Is Jane's decision to marry Rochester a satisfactory ending to the novel?Is Jane's decision to marry Rochester a satisfactory ending to the novel?

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neneta | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Valedictorian

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Yes, we may say that this conclusion is coherent with the structure of the plot. Jane has suffered a great deal by being in love to someone social superior to her. Once surpassed that barrier, her emotional shock becomes  unbearable when she finds about Rochester’s first marriage. Running away was just a temporary solution as the bond between her and Rochester was too strong. Since Bertha is dead, we may say that the main obstacle hindering their union is gone. In addition, having inherited money, Jane can marry Rochester as her social equal. On the other hand, Rochester has been punished enough- a fire has destroyed Thornfield and injured him. Thus, the interfering narrator voice can happily address the reader:  “Reader, I married him”. We may also say that Jane’s presence is necessary as a spiritual guide to Rochester.

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