In Jane Eyre, what struggle does Jane have with her identity, if any at all? In Jane Eyre, what struggle does Jane have with her identity, if any at all?

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Jane's early life has constantly attempted to force her to acknowledge that she is nothing, has no power, and must simply accept what is grudgingly given to her. In addition, she is poor and is being told she is plain, if not ugly, which for a woman in her position is yet another denial of access to power.

Yet, from an early age, she feels something else inside. Those who try to dominate her find her stronger and more resilient than they possibly could have expected. Her inner picture of herself is far from just a dependent, just a deprived student, or just a governess.

When her relationship with Mr. Rochester begins to develop, she slowly recognizes that he sees her as she has always secretly seen herself: as an intelligent, passionate, independent individual, fully capable of making her own decisions and her own life. When she runs away from Rochester because she cannot accept the conditions of life with him that he offers, she also finds the strength to reject the offers (we can even...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 644 words.)

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