In Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, the theme of first impression..what might be the pre-practical response of the reader..and also what might bethe personal respone of him...   cos i  am...

In Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, the theme of first impression..what might be the pre-practical response of the reader..and also what might be

the personal respone of him...

 

cos i  am studying practical criticism and i have to apply these2 approaches( pre- practical response +personal response) on the the theme of 1st impression in pride and prejudice

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M.P. Ossa eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I will make an attempt to answer the gist of your question, based on what I think you are asking (your question is not clear from the heading to the subheading).

OK- Practical Criticism  (response) is basically the traditional criticism "in real time", that is, you call what you see. Certainly in the case of first impressions, practical criticism was very common in Pride and Prejudice from the beginning of the story.

Mr Bingley and his party, as they arrived at the country displayed the countenance and mannerisms of the upper classes, which much awed and pleased eveyrone around them.

Mr. Wickham, superficially a wronged, victimized soldier, was a kniving, and scheming loser who even elooped with Elizabeth's sister Lydia much to the shameof the family.

Lady Katherine de Bourgh was the exemplified aristocrat whom the lower classes emulate and fancy and feel obsessed with, yet she was petulant, unintelligent and snobby.

In Pride and Prejudice the shallowness of the worst characters is illustrated by a great first impression caused among others, followed by quite the opposite reactions.

The PRE practical response is what everyone expected from the character based on what society expects of people of certain class and character. So, without asking, everyone felt that aristocracy and money buy class.  The Practical responses, called as they see it, have a lot to do with how they felt once they understood how first impressions were many times wrong in the course of the story.

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Pride and Prejudice

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