In James Hurst's "The Scarlet Ibis," who notices the bird first?

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In "The Scarlet Ibis ," Doodle, the narrator's younger brother, notices the bird first. The family is eating lunch in their dining room on a very hot Saturday at the end of the summer, and Doodle stops eating when he hears a "strange croaking noise" from outside. Doodle reaches...

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In "The Scarlet Ibis," Doodle, the narrator's younger brother, notices the bird first. The family is eating lunch in their dining room on a very hot Saturday at the end of the summer, and Doodle stops eating when he hears a "strange croaking noise" from outside. Doodle reaches the yard first, where he sees a large bird, about the size of a chicken with scarlet feathers and long legs, poised awkwardly in a tree. As they watch, the bird tumbles from the tree and dies, its eyes becoming veiled and its beak "unhinged." As the family admires the bird's elegance, "it lay on the earth like a broken vase of red flowers." 

It is important that Doodle notices the bird first because he clearly identifies with the bird, who the father says is a scarlet ibis. Soon after he sees the bird, Doodle, in some ways also an exotic and delicate creature, dies with his neck and chest stained red with blood. The bird is a symbol of Doodle's inability to adapt to his environment, in which Brother subjects Doodle to physical rigors he cannot handle. 

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