I've got a question on the book 'Invention of Hugo Cabret' by Brian Selznick: write a paragraph on how the visual techniques and prose work together to say something about character or themes. any...

I've got a question on the book 'Invention of Hugo Cabret' by Brian Selznick:

write a paragraph on how the visual techniques and prose work together to say something about character or themes.

any help would be much appreciated :) 

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The young orphan, Hugo Cabret who lives in a train station after the death of his father, finds himself drawn into the world of Georges Melies, who works at the station's toy booth. Oddly enough, Melies is a creative genius like Hugo's father; so, Hugo and the old man become friends, and Hugo learns about Melies's past. In Chapter 1, the reader learns that 

Hugo’s father had stepped into a dark room and on a white screen, he had seen a rocket fly right into the eye of the man in the moon. ...It had been like seeing his dreams in the middle of the day.

Then, in Chapter 2, Hugo views some of the pictures created by the old man:

The edges of the drawings were yellowed and brittle, but they were all beautiful, and they were all by Georges Méliès. 

In order for the reader to envision what is described in words, Brian Selznik has pages of black and white sequential art which represent stills of the film sequences for the silent movies. In addition, there are included in the book real silent movie stills (such as the rocket in the moon's eye) and archival photographs that represent the era. Then, too, some pages imitate the pan of the camera, so that the reader experiences the sensation of actually watching a silent film.

Along with illustrations that depict what is written and described, there are also drawings which create mood with colors and shapes.  Also, many of the faces are depicted with such lifelike qualities that they seem to step off the page and create dimensional images for readers, supporting a theme that art communicates with its viewers.

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