Where poem are the following lines from?

It matters not how strait the gate,How charged with punishments the scroll,I am the master of my fate:I am the captain of my soul.

My father quoted this, and I would like to read this at his funeral. I need to know what poem it was from and if there are anymore verses.

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This is actually the last stanza of a poem titled "Invictus" by William Ernest Henley, who died in 1903. Below is the full text of the poem.

Invictus OUT of the night that covers me, Black as the Pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods...

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This is actually the last stanza of a poem titled "Invictus" by William Ernest Henley, who died in 1903. Below is the full text of the poem.

Invictus

OUT of the night that covers me,
Black as the Pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance
I have not winced nor cried aloud.
Under the bludgeonings of chance
My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms but the Horror of the shade,
And yet the menace of the years
Finds, and shall find, me unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate:
I am the captain of my soul.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
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Here is the poem in its entirety. Invictus means unconquerable in Latin. William E. Henley developed tuberculosis in the bone at age 12 and had to have a leg amputated. He went on to lead an active and challenging life.

INVICTUS

Out of the night that covers me,
Black as the pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance
I have not winced nor cried aloud.
Under the bludgeonings of chance
My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms but the horror of the shade,
And yet the menace of the years
Finds, -and shall find, me unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate ;
I am the captain of my soul.

W. E. Henley (1875)
Approved by eNotes Editorial Team