It can be argued that studies of animal behavior are relevant to human psychology because humans are thought to have evolved from other species. Explain with examples how the results of Harlow's animal research studies can be related to human behavior.

The results of Harlow's animal research studies can be related to human behavior in the field of child development. In his extensive research with rhesus monkeys, Harlow found that infant monkeys separated from their mothers experienced social and emotional damage as well as psychological disturbance. Many psychologists have observed a similar phenomenon among human infants.

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Harry Harlow was one of many twentieth-century psychologists who believed that studying animal psychology could provide insights into human psychology. Under the general heading of comparative psychology, Harlow and other psychologists operated according to the assumption that different species were subject to the same laws of behavior. In terms of...

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Harry Harlow was one of many twentieth-century psychologists who believed that studying animal psychology could provide insights into human psychology. Under the general heading of comparative psychology, Harlow and other psychologists operated according to the assumption that different species were subject to the same laws of behavior. In terms of psychological research, this meant that insights derived from studying the behavior of animals could be extended to humans.

Harlow conducted his research in a number of different areas. But his most important contributions came in relation to child development. In a series of experiments that exemplified the methodology of comparative psychology, Harlow closely studied the behavior of rhesus monkeys.

One of the most important conclusions he drew from his research was that if infant monkeys were separated from their mothers, they would go on to experience significant emotional and social damage. Harlow also noted how the natural kinship bond between infant and mother would be transferred to surrogate mothers made out of cloth and wire wool.

Successive generations of comparative psychologists have built upon the implications of Harlow's studies, applying them with suitable modifications to human infants. As a result of this research, it is now generally understood just how important caregiving is to the formation of personality as well as cognitive and social development in humans.

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