Is this line from Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 in trochee? Or is it in iambic pentameter?

This thou perceiv'st which makes thy love more strong.

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The two forms of a two-beat foot in scansion are Iamb and Trochee. The iamb is the most common (with the emphasis or stress on the second syllable), the foot of the iambic pentameter line that dominates most sonnets (“Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day”); the trochee, less...

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The two forms of a two-beat foot in scansion are Iamb and Trochee. The iamb is the most common (with the emphasis or stress on the second syllable), the foot of the iambic pentameter line that dominates most sonnets (“Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day”); the trochee, less common, is the foot in which the emphasis is on the first syllable: Landlord, nightgown, elbow, etc. The very word “trochee” is a trochee, which is a good mnemonic device for remembering the difference. The line in question begins with a trochaic foot—“This thou,” then proceeds by iambic feet--“perceiv’st,” “which makes,” thy love,” “more strong.” So the line is a pentameter line (five feet) that starts with one trochiac foot, followed by four iambic feet.
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