Is there any use of poetic devices such as similes, metaphors, imagery or personification in "One Thousand Dollars" by O. Henry? If so, where in the story?

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With the way that O. Henry writes, there are always examples of things like this in his stories.  Let me list a few.

Early on in the story, when Gillian is talking to Old Bryson, he mentions that he has been to the offices of his "legal corsairs."  This is...

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With the way that O. Henry writes, there are always examples of things like this in his stories.  Let me list a few.

Early on in the story, when Gillian is talking to Old Bryson, he mentions that he has been to the offices of his "legal corsairs."  This is a metaphor in which he compares lawyers to pirates.

A little bit later, the author describes the amount of interest that Old Bryson has in Gillian's story.  Old Bryson is described as

showing as much interest as a bee shows in a vinegar cruet

This is a comparison that is done directly, using the word "as."  Therefore, it is a simile.

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