Is there a shift in the setting of the story in paragraphs 3 and 4? Where do the events of "Vanka" take place?

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Vanka, the title character, is writing an SOS to Konstantin Makarich, the man he calls Grandfather. Deeply unhappy with life, he wants Konstantin to rescue him from the cruelty and abuse he's forced to endure on a daily basis while working as an apprentice to Alyakhin the shoemaker.

Vanka's...

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Vanka, the title character, is writing an SOS to Konstantin Makarich, the man he calls Grandfather. Deeply unhappy with life, he wants Konstantin to rescue him from the cruelty and abuse he's forced to endure on a daily basis while working as an apprentice to Alyakhin the shoemaker.

Vanka's utterly miserable, and in the third and fourth paragraphs of the story thinks back to happier times when he lived with his Grandfather on the estate belonging to the Zhivarev family. He reminisces about how his Grandfather used to patrol the estate at night, in his capacity as nightwatchman, with his none too reliable watchdogs Old Kashtanka and Eel in tow.

As he continues to write his letter Vanka also imagines what the old man is currently doing. He thinks of him as joking merily with the servants and offering a pinch of snuff to the women, which would make them sneeze, much to Konstantin's amusement. Grandfather's happy, jolly demeanor contrasts sharply with the utter misery of poor little Vanka's daily existence. It's no wonder, given how appallingly he's treated by Alyakhin and his wife, that he should want to escape his current life and reunite with Konstantin Makarich once more.

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