Is the society of Animal Farm a classless one?

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The purpose of the Rebellion and the expulsion of Mr. Jones is to create a society which is based on equality, not on distinction-like class. This is shown clearly through the Seventh Commandment: "All animals are equal."

However, once the Rebellion occurs, class distinctions become increasingly common. In fact, this...

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The purpose of the Rebellion and the expulsion of Mr. Jones is to create a society which is based on equality, not on distinction-like class. This is shown clearly through the Seventh Commandment: "All animals are equal."

However, once the Rebellion occurs, class distinctions become increasingly common. In fact, this happens as early as chapter 2, when Napoleon steals the milk for the pigs' mash. When Squealer justifies this theft in the next chapter, he says that the pigs are "brainworkers," meaning that they need milk to fuel their minds. The result of this is to create a distinction between the pigs and the other animals.

By chapter 9, class divisions in this society have become normalized. The thirty-one piglets, for example, are discouraged from playing with the other animals and are allowed to wear green ribbons in their tails. What this shows us is that class division is a defining feature of life in this society. Thanks to the ambitions of the pigs, Old Major's dream of a classless, egalitarian society never came true.

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The animal farm as originally conceived was meant to be a classless society. One of the seven commandments was "All animals are equal." However,in practice this was never the case. The pigs assumed a leading role and continued to grab power until the commandment read: Some animals are equal, but some are more equal that others. You can trace the loss of equality by watching the different commandments as they are broken and then re-written. The first commandment is "Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy." However, at the end of the novel, the pigs are walking on their hind legs. As an allegory, Orwell is commenting on the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. It was supposed to be a classless society, too. From the beginning, the revolution needed leaders. Lenin was the first to lead but died ( as Old Major) before many of the reforms he backed could be initiated. Sadly, the end result was the rule of Stalin (Napoleon) who killed millions in his surge to power.

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