Is The Kite Runner told from an American Perspective or from an Afghan perspective? Provide textual evidence.

The Kite Runner is told from an Afghan perspective, filtered through Amir's modern views. Amir’s formative years are spent in Afghanistan. The important people in his life are Afghans. He meets Soraya in an Afghan flea market. When Soraya’s father is ill, his wife sings “songs. . .from Kabul.” When Amir wants to marry Soraya, he takes the old-fashioned Afghan approach. Amir's life in Afghanistan and in Afghan society in America inform his views.

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The Kite Runner is told from an Afghan perspective, although it is filtered through the eyes of a man, Amir, who has lived in the United States for many years and holds more modern views than many of his peers in Afghanistan. Moreover, Amir has been raised by Baba, who...

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The Kite Runner is told from an Afghan perspective, although it is filtered through the eyes of a man, Amir, who has lived in the United States for many years and holds more modern views than many of his peers in Afghanistan. Moreover, Amir has been raised by Baba, who in many ways is an extremely enlightened individual. He tells Amir,

"There are only three real men in this world, Amir," he'd say. He'd count them off on his fingers: America the brash savior, Britain, and Israel.

He also tells Amir that his narrow-minded, dogmatic instructors are “self-righteous monkeys,” saying that

If there's a God out there, then I would hope he has more important things to attend to than my drinking scotch or eating pork.

Amir’s formative years through his teenage years are spent in Afghanistan. When he refers to Baba’s house, he says that “in the eighteen years that [he] lived in that house,” he visited Ali and Hassan’s quarters infrequently. In fact, in many ways, Amir and Baba’s adjustment to life in America is a long and difficult one. For Amir, America represents a chance to escape the memories of the sins that haunt him from Afghanistan, but he cannot escape them. He states out the outset of the book that the memory from the alley made him what he is as an adult, and only by returning to Afghanistan is he finally able to heal.

For me, America was a place to bury my memories. For Baba, a place to mourn his.

Moreover, the most important people in his life are other Afghans, most of whom he met and interacted with in his country of birth. He meets Soraya and her parents in an Afghan flea market, which in some ways is an ethnic enclave of Afghanistan within the United States.

Despite enjoying many things about America, Amir continues to live in a mostly Afghan setting and it is his life in Afghanistan and in Afghan society in America that informs his views. When Soraya’s father is in the hospital, his wife would

sing to him, songs [Amir] remembered from Kabul, playing on Baba's scratchy old transistor radio.

When Amir wants to marry Soraya, he takes the old-fashioned Afghan approach and sends Baba to ask her father for her hand.

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