Is Shakespeare using the convention of the ghost in the classical revenge play to explore the possibility and problem of divine revelation?

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I agree with lentzk as noted above and would add that the idea of divine revelation isn't a theme that is explored in any significant way anywhere else in the play. Yes, Hamlet hesitates to act because he can't be sure the ghost is a "true ghost" and not the...

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I agree with lentzk as noted above and would add that the idea of divine revelation isn't a theme that is explored in any significant way anywhere else in the play. Yes, Hamlet hesitates to act because he can't be sure the ghost is a "true ghost" and not the devil in disguise, but once that is established, it is never discussed again.

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No, the ghost in Hamlet is more of a much needed plot development tool.  Ghosts are common elements in revenge plays, and more importantly Shakespeare needs someone to stir Hamlet into action against his uncle.  Someone has to warn him against his uncle's nefarious deeds; who better than his deceased father?  Shakespeare uses the ghost, because of convenience and familiarity. 

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