Is Doctor Faustus misled by the devil or is he willfully blind to his situation in Marlowe's Doctor Faustus?

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Faustus is misled by the devil, because that is what the devil does—he is the Prince of Lies. But primarily and overwhelmingly, Faustus is willfully blind to his situation—he wants power, which is why he turned to the black arts to the begin with, and even the good angel who...

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Faustus is misled by the devil, because that is what the devil does—he is the Prince of Lies. But primarily and overwhelmingly, Faustus is willfully blind to his situation—he wants power, which is why he turned to the black arts to the begin with, and even the good angel who arrives to persuade him against selling his soul while Faustus is negotiating with the devil can't sway him. Faustus willfully stabs his own arm and writes out the pact with the devil in his blood. He wants to be "omnipotent." He freely chooses his path.

At the end of the play, too, Faustus has every chance to repent and turn back to God. The Old Man, God's representative, tries to persuade him to repent, because even at that late hour, God would forgive him. But Faustus is proud and self-willed to the end and only believes what he wants to believe, which is his downfall. Because he can't conceive that God would forgive him, he is dragged to everlasting torment.

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