Introduction to the book of John in the Bible.

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The Gospel according to John (Greek: Εὐαγγέλιον κατὰ Ἰωάννην) is one of the four Gospels or accounts of the "good news" (from the Old English godspel or glad tidings) in the New Testament. The four gospels are typically divided into two groups, the three "synoptic" gospels (Mark, Matthew, and Luke)...

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The Gospel according to John (Greek: Εὐαγγέλιον κατὰ Ἰωάννην) is one of the four Gospels or accounts of the "good news" (from the Old English godspel or glad tidings) in the New Testament. The four gospels are typically divided into two groups, the three "synoptic" gospels (Mark, Matthew, and Luke) and John, with the synoptics conveying similar information concerning the life of Jesus and John differing from them in viewpoint and many material details.

The Gospel of John probably achieved its current form between approximately 80 to 100 AD and represents a tradition ascribed to John, one of the twelve disciples of Jesus Christ, who is described as the "disciple that Jesus loved" or the "beloved disciple." It is distinctive in its highly symbolic and mystical nature and its emphasis on Jesus's divine nature. It is the most theological and mystical of the Gospels. Its opening, rather than giving a human genealogy of Jesus, emphasizes Jesus's divine nature as the incarnate word of God and his association with the light and spirit of God:

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. ... In him was life; and the life was the light of men. ... That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world.

The Gospel of John is divided into twenty-one chapters. It covers Jesus's birth, his ministry, his preparation of his disciples for their future ministry, his death, and his post-resurrection appearance to his disciples. Rather than emphasizing the death of Jesus as atonement and sacrifice, it focuses on his death as a necessary prelude to his ascension into heaven and resurrection. Many scholars have noted that John's theology has several elements in common with Gnosticism and that it represents a mystical strand in Christianity, which it shares in common with the other Johannine books of the New Testament.

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