In Into the Wild, Jon Krakauer presents the story in non-chronological order. What is the effect of this narrative choice?

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By beginning near the end of the story with Chris McCandless's arrival in Alaska for his great epic adventure, and then the discovery of his remains in an abandoned bus in the wilderness, Krakauer does two things: first, he raises our curiosity. How did an adventure that began with such high hopes—and yet the sense of foreboding reflected in McCandless's letter to Wayne Westerberg: "If this adventure proves fatal and you don’t ever hear from me again I want you to know you're a great man"—go so wrong? What specifically happened between the time Alex was last seen alive and the discovery of his decomposed corpse? Krakauer won't get to those details until near the end of the book.

Secondly, by starting at the end of the story, Krakauer is indicating that this book will be centrally concerned with exploring Chris's death. The facts of his life will be important insofar as they provide an explanation for how it ended. This makes sense because the book arose out of a 1993 article...

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