In steps, how does Scout's views change on Boo Radley in To Kill a Mockingbird? Use quotes and important passages from the book.I have to write a paper on this, and I have to explain in each...

In steps, how does Scout's views change on Boo Radley in To Kill a Mockingbird? Use quotes and important passages from the book.

I have to write a paper on this, and I have to explain in each paragraph how Scout's views changed on Boo Radley throughout the book. And then how she thought of him in the end. I really need help!

Asked on by bmhanna14

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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In the beginning of the novel, Scout's narration explains that Boo was "a malevolent phantom." They had never seen him, but they believed the stories (most of them, anyway) they had heard: that he killed cats, ate squirrels, poisoned pecans, and peeped in windows. They believed Boo would kill them if he got the chance.

"... he'll kill us each and every one, Dill Harris," said Jem.

Dill's curiosity drove Jem and Scout toward the goal of making Boo come out. They were still afraid of him until the presents in the knothole began to appear. After eliminating all other possibilities, the children unspokenly agreed that Boo was the giver of the gifts. Miss Maudie assured them that most of the rumors about Boo were untrue and that they

"... were three-fourths colored folks and one-fourth Stephanie Crawford."

Jem's and Scout's goals changed once again, especially after Scout thought she heard laughter coming from the Radley house. They wanted to communicate with Boo--actually see him and talk with him, and their fear began to fade. The clincher came when Jem went back to retrieve his lost pants, only to find them folded and mended, waiting for him on the fence. On the night Miss Maudie's house burned down, the mysterious blanket that Scout found on her shoulders came from Boo, Atticus explained. By then, the knothole had already been sealed, and the children began to believe that they would never see Boo Radley.

Dill later tells us that he feels sorry for Boo and understands why he stays inside his house.

"... it's because he wants to stay inside."

By the night of the fateful Halloween attack, the children have little fear of passing the Radley house. They certainly didn't fear an attack from Boo, but attacks from others had not entered their minds. When Scout sees Boo standing in Jem's room following the news of Bob Ewell's death, she realizes that it was Boo who had saved them. "Mr. Arthur" immediately went from unseen phantom to a real-life hero, and she only wished that Jem could have been awake to see Boo for himself.

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