In The Secret Life of Bees, what about Thoreau's Walden Pond appeals to Lily?Chapter 3 LIly alludes to Thoreau's Walden Pond, in which Henry David Thoreau chooses to live alone. What about this...

In The Secret Life of Bees, what about Thoreau's Walden Pond appeals to Lily?

Chapter 3

LIly alludes to Thoreau's Walden Pond, in which Henry David Thoreau chooses to live alone. What about this appeals to Lily?

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dymatsuoka eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Lily instinctively harbors an appreciation for the natural world, and in addition to this, it is the peace and solitude Thoreau describes in Walden Pond which appeals to her.  Beneath the hand of her domineering father, life at home is unbearable, and Lily longs to escape it. After reading portions of Walden Pond, she has

"fantasies of going to a private garden where T. Ray would never find (her)...(she) started appreciating Mother Nature, what she'd done with the world."

Nature provides solace for the young girl who has grown up in a particularly loveless environment. When she awakens by the water on the first morning of her journey of escape with Rosaleen, she finds that

"a barge of mist floated along the water, and dragonflies, iridescent blue ones, darted back and forth like they were stitching up the air."

The beauty of the scene evokes memories of Thoreau's writings, and, like the famed writer, who wrote of his time of retreat by the pond as it unfolded in a journal, she thinks of the day as

"Day one of (her) new life."
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The Secret Life of Bees

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