In To Kill a Mockingbird, interpret Jem's healthy appetite when no one else can eat after the events of Chapter 15.This happened the day after the children followed Atticus to the jail and the mob...

In To Kill a Mockingbird, interpret Jem's healthy appetite when no one else can eat after the events of Chapter 15.

This happened the day after the children followed Atticus to the jail and the mob almost attacked him.

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e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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The morning following the scene that takes place outside of the jail finds Jem as the only member of the family with an appetite. 

The episode at the jail the previous night can be seen as a victory, orchestrated almost accidentally by Scout.

Scout recognizes a schoolmate's father, Mr. Cunningham, and asks him polite questions about his legal debt to Atticus... Scout's innocent questioning of Mr. Cunningham shames him, and he convinces the men to leave.

Jem is apparently invigorated by this foray into the "real", adult world. He is also invigorated by the sense of victory found there. The trial is set to begin later in the day and Jem's idealism is fully intact. He is able to eat vigorously, gathering energy for what he sees as an exciting day. 
 
Atticus is not subject to such idealism and he understands both what nearly happened outside the jail (even with his children present) and the difficult nature of the task at hand (his role in the trial). In the light of day, Scout begins to realize the danger they were in the previous night.
 
Scout herself gives in to the fear and confusion she feels and bursts with tears.

 
For these reasons, Scout and Atticus have little appetite at breakfast. 
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