In Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, which characters support Linda? Which characters oppose Linda?

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Linda is supported by her own family members, her first mistress, and the Bruce family. Linda is opposed by the Flints.

At the beginning, Linda has a decent life. Her mother is a good cook, and her father is an esteemed carpenter. In fact, Linda does not even know she...

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Linda is supported by her own family members, her first mistress, and the Bruce family. Linda is opposed by the Flints.

At the beginning, Linda has a decent life. Her mother is a good cook, and her father is an esteemed carpenter. In fact, Linda does not even know she is a slave until she turns six (when her mother dies). Even at that point, she is given to her very first mistress who is a pleasure to work for in that she teaches Linda to read and allows her to "sew for hours" while she sits by her mistress' side. Later on, Mrs. Bruce supports Linda by caring for her children's welfare. As noted above, it is Mrs. Bruce who says that "it is better for you to have the baby with you, Linda." Encouraging Linda to take her child with her on the journey shows that Mrs. Bruce is truly on Linda's side. Of course, "Aunt Marthy" (who is actually Linda's maternal grandmother) is always in support of Linda as well. It is for this reason that Linda's grandmother's house is searched "from top to bottom" when Linda escapes.

On the other hand, Dr. Flint and Mrs. Flint are most definitely opposed to Linda. They verbally abuse her continually. Further, Dr. Flint sexually harasses Linda. Mrs. Flint is jealous of Linda and takes it out on her. Dr. Flint continually says things like the following:

By heavens, girl, you forget yourself too far! Are you mad? If you are, I will soon bring you to your senses. 

Dr. Flint dresses Linda in a "scanty wardrobe" on purpose (in order to provide himself the pleasure of looking at her). He continually makes sexual advances, hoping that Linda will comply willingly. She never does; therefore, Dr. Flint continues his verbal abuse until she escapes.

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