In your opinion, does Hamlet successfully achieve his goals before dying?

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Hamlet, on the whole, successfully achieves his goals before for dying. His two goals as act five, scene two opens are expressed to Horatio. First, he tells Horatio the story of Claudius sending him to England with orders in the hands of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern that he be...

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Hamlet, on the whole, successfully achieves his goals before for dying. His two goals as act five, scene two opens are expressed to Horatio. First, he tells Horatio the story of Claudius sending him to England with orders in the hands of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern that he be executed as soon as he steps on shore. Hamlet turns the tables and writes up new orders that Rosencrantz and Guildenstern be executed. However, the treachery of Claudius confirms for him that he must kill this evil uncle, who has murdered his father, married his mother, blocked his ascension to the throne, and tried to have him killed. He says to Horatio that he feels he can kill Claudius in good conscience:
Does it not, think thee, stand me now upon—
He that hath killed my king and whored my mother,
Popped in between th' election and my hopes,
Thrown out his angle for my proper life
(And with such cozenage!)—is’t not perfect conscience
To quit him with this arm?
Hamlet's second goal is to trust providence. He is convinced from his narrow escape from death in England that God is carefully watching over him, guiding his fate. He agrees to the sword fight with Laertes, despite Horatio's misgivings, because he has decided it is up to God to decide when and where he dies, stating:
There’s a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, ’tis not to come. If it be not to come, it will be now. If it be not now, yet it will come.
Hamlet enters the sword fight with a sense of peace and conviction he has not had during the rest of the play. His anguish is over, and he is finally grounded. During the sword fight, he achieves his goal of killing Claudius, doing so after he realizes that Claudius has poisoned Gertrude. Hamlet also faces his own death bravely, because he now trusts in God. He is at peace with his death. He names Fortinbras as his heir and prevails on Horatio to stay alive so he can tell the true story of what happened.
Implicit, however, throughout the play, is Hamlet's desire to protect his mother. This he is not able to do, so to that extent he has not fulfilled all his goals—but he has fulfilled most of them.
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