In what ways is the princess similar to her father?

The princess in "The Lady, or the Tiger?" shares her father's semi-barbaric nature and imperious spirit. Similar to her father, the princess is an independent thinker who is bold, hotblooded, and resolute. The princess also has a passionate, intense personality which resembles that of her father.

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The princess in the story "The Lady, or the Tiger?" is described as having a "soul as fervent and imperious" as her "semi-barbaric" father, who is depicted as a rather cruel and unusual ruler. He has developed a unique system of justice where an accused individual stands in the middle...

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The princess in the story "The Lady, or the Tiger?" is described as having a "soul as fervent and imperious" as her "semi-barbaric" father, who is depicted as a rather cruel and unusual ruler. He has developed a unique system of justice where an accused individual stands in the middle of an arena and must choose between two doors to determine his fate. The narrator also adds that the king is given to "self-communing" and that "nothing pleased him so much as to make the crooked straight and crush down uneven places."

The semi-barbaric king ruthlessly wields his authority and finds his unfair and unpredictable method of justice to be ingenious. He is bold, passionate, and violent. Similarly, the king's daughter is also an intense, "hot-blooded" person who is used to having her way. The princess demonstrates her independent spirit by choosing a courtier for her lover without her father's permission. When the young courtier is sentenced to test his fate in the arena, the princess illustrates her powerful will by discovering what awaits her lover behind each door. The princess's jealousy and anger toward the lovely maiden also resemble her father's vengeful nature. In the end, she demonstrates that she shares her father's resolute, individualistic personality by taking matters into her own hands and intervening in the public event. While Stockton purposely leaves the story's conclusion open, the reader gets the sense that the semi-barbaric princess may well lead her lover to his death.

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