In what ways does "The Power" reflect modern society?

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Naomi Alderman’s novel explores the idea of categorical role reversal, in which human females gain tremendous, natural physical power that renders them stronger than males. This sudden, inexplicable, global change most obviously connects to gender imbalances but can also be understood in connection with natural power in other categories.

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Naomi Alderman’s novel explores the idea of categorical role reversal, in which human females gain tremendous, natural physical power that renders them stronger than males. This sudden, inexplicable, global change most obviously connects to gender imbalances but can also be understood in connection with natural power in other categories.

The character of Margot Cleary and the initiatives she undertakes to help educate and empower girls is comparable to programs that are being developed around the world as we approach 2020. One area where such initiatives connect is in female participation in the technology sphere. Power can be understood as information and controlling its distribution, which increasingly occurs through computers and the internet. Similarly, powerful women have used their celebrity to encourage female education, such as Oprah Winfrey and the Leadership Academy for Girls that operates in Africa.

When we consider power as the ability to influence the fate of the world, female roles are becoming increasingly significant. The participation of girls and young women in political empowerment and decision-making for their future has become notable in the 2010s. These phenomena can be seen in the Fridays for Future movement and Greta Thunberg’s leadership role in promoting attention to climate change.

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