In what ways did Andrew Jackson represent the major developments of his era: westward movement, the Market Revolution, and the expansion of democracy for some alongside the limits on it for others?

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Jackson was quite important in the westward expansion movement. His Indian Removal Act allowed white settlers to move on to thousands of acres of Native American land in the Southeast. Jackson also attempted to buy what would become the Republic of Texas from Mexico.

During Jackson's eight year term, cotton...

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Jackson was quite important in the westward expansion movement. His Indian Removal Act allowed white settlers to move on to thousands of acres of Native American land in the Southeast. Jackson also attempted to buy what would become the Republic of Texas from Mexico.

During Jackson's eight year term, cotton production expanded a great deal in the South. Even though Jackson was an enemy of the Bank of the United States as he thought it gave too much power to the federal government, Jackson upheld what Southerners called the Tariff of Abominations that protected Northern manufacturing interests. Jackson was also against national infrastructure projects as he thought these were the prerogative of the states.

Jackson's victory was considered a victory for the Common Man as a Westerner was in office for the first time. Political campaigns would now focus on slogans and rallies in order to create excitement around the candidate. During the 1828 election, Jackson's humble origins were on display even though by then he had become one of the most affluent planters in Middle Tennessee. This type of campaign strategy would continue to be popular throughout the antebellum period. Jackson ignored the Supreme Court ruling that would have allowed the Cherokee to stay on their tribal lands and instead he signed off on their removal to Oklahoma. It was also during Jackson's presidency that the gag rule was in affect, making it taboo to mention slavery on the floor of Congress. Jackson represented western landowners when he stood up for westward expansion but this was at the expense of Native Americans and African Americans.

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Andrew Jackson was known as the "common man's" president and the president of the rugged individual (often synonymous with the capitalist). Andrew Jackson is also infamously known for being the man who spearheaded the forced removal and genocide of indigenous tribes from East of the Mississippi. The "common man" is certainly only limited to the white man, and even then, ultra poor white men were not included in this phrase. Women of all races were certainly not included in this supposed expansion of democracy.

Mostly, a rising rural working-middle class of men, industrial working class men of the North, and small business entrepreneurs who supported the institution of slavery and westward expansion benefited from Andrew Jackson's policies and practices. Jackson's relation to the rise of capitalism can be seen in his support of individual property ownership such as through support of slave owning planters, entrepreneurship, the growth of railroads and railroad companies.

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Andrew Jackson is often regarded as the embodiment of these three developments, largely because they were themselves interrelated.

To take the first, Jackson actively championed the removal of Native Americans from their ancestral lands, which was seen as necessary to the settlement of what was then called the "Southwest": modern-day Alabama and Mississippi. This cleared the way for American settlement of the region and was in many ways a centerpiece of Jackson's domestic policy. Jackson also attempted to purchase the territory of Texas from Mexico, and though he did not openly advocate the annexation of that territory, he tacitly supported proponents of annexation within the Texas Republic.

Jackson's association with the Market Revolution, a phrase used to describe the emergence of market capitalism in the United States, is more complex. On the one hand, some historians have argued that he set himself against the changes wrought by the Market Revolution, pointing in particular to his opposition to the program of internal improvement championed by Whig leaders and his "Bank War" against the Bank of the United States. He also came to office on the votes of Northern urban workers, many of whom had suffered from the economic changes of the period. At the same time, recent historians have emphasized that the Market Revolution was driven in many ways by the emerging cotton economy, and Jackson's actions while President, especially the Indian Removal Act, played a major role in making this happen.

Finally, Jacksonian democracy was inherently racialized. We can see this by the many states that expanded voting rights to all white men during the period while simultaneously denying free blacks the right to vote. We can also see this in the fact that a cornerstone of Jacksonian democracy was Native American removal, which secured lands on which white farmers settled and cultivated cotton (through the labor of the enslaved). Jackson also took steps to prohibit the dissemination of abolitionist literature in the South and approved of the so-called "gag rule" adopted in response to antislavery petitions to Congress. Jackson, more than perhaps any other American politician, perceived how the extension of white democracy was dependent on the subjugation of nonwhites.

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