In what way does the narrator say his movie will differ from other prison movies in Monster?

At the beginning of Monster, Steve Harmon explains that his movie will differ from other prison films because it is not all about "bars and locked doors." Steve says his movie is more about experiencing loneliness and constant fear, which are strong emotions that other prison films often fail to capture.

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In Walter Dean Myer's novel Monster , Steve Harmon narrates the story in the form of a screenplay, which captures his terrifying experience in jail while he is on trial for the robbery and murder of a Harlem drugstore owner named Alguinaldo Nesbitt. Steve Harmon is an aspiring screenwriter and...

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In Walter Dean Myer's novel Monster, Steve Harmon narrates the story in the form of a screenplay, which captures his terrifying experience in jail while he is on trial for the robbery and murder of a Harlem drugstore owner named Alguinaldo Nesbitt. Steve Harmon is an aspiring screenwriter and describes the differences between common prison movies and his unique screenplay by writing,

I have seen movies of prisons but never one like this. This is not a movie about bars and locked doors. It is about being alone when you are not really alone and about being scared all the time. (Myers, 7)

Steve plans on providing his future audience with an in-depth, realistic perspective of his terrifying experience in prison. According to Steve, most prison movies simply depict the obvious struggles of prison life by highlighting the appearance of the jail and focusing on external issues. In contrast, Steve's film will focus on the dark, lonesome experience of being in prison, where there is always the threat of violence and danger, which is extremely terrifying.

Throughout the story, the reader gains insight into Steve's difficult personal experiences via his diary entries, which reveal his constant fear, anxiety, and depression. As a sixteen-year-old boy on trial for his life, Steve Harmon struggles to cope with the reality of his situation but desires to translate his horrifying experience onto a movie screen someday. Steve's screenplay is a realistic portrayal of how he deals with depression and continually questions his identity. As a screenwriter, Steve is primarily focused on examining and depicting his tortured mindset, which is something other prison films often neglect to illustrate.

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