In Walk Two Moons, how does the setting impact the novel?  

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In literature, the setting is where and when a story takes place. Walk Two Moons, a novel by Sharon Creech , essentially has two settings. One setting is in Salamanca "Sal" Tree Hiddle's home in Euclid, Ohio. The other setting is along the road trip from Ohio to Idaho...

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In literature, the setting is where and when a story takes place. Walk Two Moons, a novel by Sharon Creech, essentially has two settings. One setting is in Salamanca "Sal" Tree Hiddle's home in Euclid, Ohio. The other setting is along the road trip from Ohio to Idaho that Sal takes with her grandparents to find her mother's final resting place.

The setting at Sal's home in Euclid, Ohio impacts the novel because it is a reminder to readers that Sal does not consider this home her true home. Sal believes that her home in Bybanks, Kentucky is her true home and where she belongs.

The road trip setting impacts this novel because it acts as a way for Sal to feel connected to her mother. Each place that Sal and her grandparents stop is a place that her mother stopped. Through the road trip readers learn that Sal's mother has passed away and that this trip is a way to let Sal really understand and process her feelings.

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There are two separate stories in the novel: one takes place in Sal’s new home of Euclid, Ohio, and the other is on the road with her grandparents, traveling to Idaho. Sal makes it clear from the beginning that her real home is in Bybanks, Kentucky, where she had lived with her parents before her mother left home. Bybanks is in the country and a place of wide, open spaces. Euclid is a town where Sal feels crowded in. She misses the trees of Bybanks. She feels this defines her; Euclid does not. Yet her father needs to be in Euclid since they have learned that Sal’s mother is not returning.

On the road, Sal prays to the trees, hoping to get to Idaho by her mother’s birthday to bring her home. Each stop on the way is a place where her mother stopped. She had taken a bus and sent postcards to Sal along the way. The road serves as a link to her mother, Sal feels. Her grandparents (her father’s parents) are eccentric, but she loves them. They remind her of Bybanks.

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